Playing the fife

 

With a year four class on the 24th of April, I taught the basic sheet music scale to them which looks like this underneath.

The scale shown above ranges from a low C to a high C and then back down to a low C (Jarrett et al, 2008). We learnt this a group and then I demonstrated this on the flute. The school provided each child with a fife instrument which looks like the photo underneath.

The reason why I chose this instrument was because they are different and an unusual instrument children might not come across as often. We learnt all the notes above on the fife and strung together the very simple ‘Hot Cross Buns’. A lot of the children found moving their fingers from hole to hole quickly challenging and others found the blowing

The reason why I chose these instruments was because they are different and an unusual instrument children might not come across as often. We learnt all the notes above on the fife and strung together the very simple ‘Hot Cross Buns’. A lot of the children found moving their fingers from hole to hole quickly challenging and others found the blowing into the instrument and making the sound equally challenging. Next time I deliver a session with fifes I am going to make it clear how your lips need to be placed as there is a very specific technique needing to be used. For future, I need to think of a fun game to introduce the fife for example like a captain’s coming game (teachers here – fifes down, rooty tooty – any musical tune, warm up – blow directly down the fife to warm it up, in the library – play quietly, in the open – make the loudest sound you can).

Reference list

Jarrett, S, & Day, H n.d., Music Composition For Dummies, n.p.: Chichester : John Wiley, 2008, Marjon Library Catalogue, EBSCOhost, viewed 2 May 2017.

Leave a Reply

Skip to toolbar